NaNo Prep: How to Write About What You Don’t Know

lettersandlight:

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NaNo Prep season is here, and we’re asking the folks at NaNo HQ and our friends to help you get ready to tell your story this November. If you’re considering stretching out of your comfort zone to write about a culture or experience different from your own, author Crystal Chan has a few easy tips to figure out if you’re ready:

The old adage is, Write what you know. But what if you find yourself writing about what you don’t know—if you’re a female writer writing about a male protagonist, or a white writer developing a Vietnamese character, or an able-bodied writer crafting a story about someone who’s disabled?

If this is you, congratulations. You’re pushing your limits, and expanding your world. And take a deep breath, because a heavy dose of research—and humility—will be involved. You can’t just conjecture because you’ll do so using your own frame of reference. Writing about what you don’t know explicitly means that you can’t rely on your own experiences. You have to do so much research that this new material becomes what you know.

Here are some launching points for those who want to tackle this issue:

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Esattamente ciò di cui avevo bisogno ! Thanks !

pixalry:

How To Train Your Dragon - Created by Daniel Govar

markruffalo:

mamalaz:

The Avengers as a Western

Steve is the Sheriff. Clint is his deputy. Tony is the Blacksmith. Natasha runs the Saloon. Bruce is the physician with a split personality and Thor gets into a hell of a lot of tavern brawls.

Together, however, they manage to bring order to the once corrupt town of Triskelion.

Remember The Avengers as a 70s Cop Drama? A Western might be cooler.

Reblog if you’re participating in NaNoWriMo 2014.

Use this post to find other users who are participating and support each other. Create Skype groups to make group calls, make TinyChats for late night catch-ups, form Chatzys for word wars and sprints, whatever!

If you have no idea what I’m on about, click here for more info. There’s still time to join in!

I CAN’T WAIT !

A message from Anonimo
I've been writing a novel for a while, but now I don't know if I should continue. I'm writing in Spanish because that's my native language and I don't have much confidence in English, but I'm afraid no editorial will accept it since the theme is somehow weird... What should I do?
A reply from thewritingcafe

I’m not seeing how the language of the novel relates to the theme. Are you asking if it’s possible to find an editor who will take both a weird theme and a novel written in Spanish? Because it is possible. The Spanish-language publishing market is big so it should be easy to find publishers and editors who take Spanish, even in countries where Spanish is not the dominant language, such as the US.

As for the theme, no theme is too weird. You’ll be fine. Keep writing. 

Wonderful answer :)

jaredleto:

Hi. 

jaredleto:

Hi. 

pixalry:

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - Created by GhostHause

Available as prints at the Artist’s Shop. You can find more on Tumblr and Twitter!

The movie is absolutely amazing  !

theoneandonlycompanion:

kastiakbc:

luvindowney:

Tony Stark everybody

there is no more robert downey jr

there is only tony stark now

im afraid to think of the outcome if he’d been cast as loki

imaspongeboblover:

Colpa delle Stelle, John Green

This is the feeling. The Fault in our stars. Gosh, I thought I was prepared. I read the book, for fuck’s sake, I KNEW ! Then I went to the cinema. Then I watched the movie. Then everyone in the theater was crying. And crying. And crying … c_c

imaspongeboblover:

Colpa delle Stelle, John Green

This is the feeling. The Fault in our stars. Gosh, I thought I was prepared. I read the book, for fuck’s sake, I KNEW ! Then I went to the cinema. Then I watched the movie. Then everyone in the theater was crying. And crying. And crying … c_c

fishingboatproceeds:

SO SO SO SO SO SO EXCITED that the brilliant Jacqueline Woodson's book Brown Girl Dreaming is a New York Times bestseller.
It’s a fascinating and beautiful memoir-in-verse about the way that history shapes the lives of individuals, and how one girl grew up. Woodson is one of our best and smartest writers for children, but as an adult who has read this book twice in the last couple months, I can tell you that this book is truly for everyone.
YAY YAY YAY YAY.

fishingboatproceeds:

SO SO SO SO SO SO EXCITED that the brilliant Jacqueline Woodson's book Brown Girl Dreaming is a New York Times bestseller.

It’s a fascinating and beautiful memoir-in-verse about the way that history shapes the lives of individuals, and how one girl grew up. Woodson is one of our best and smartest writers for children, but as an adult who has read this book twice in the last couple months, I can tell you that this book is truly for everyone.

YAY YAY YAY YAY.

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

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Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

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I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

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[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

Cuuuuteee *^*

felixuta:Wish of Love | via Tumblr pe We Heart It.

Love the fandom

felixuta:

Wish of Love | via Tumblr pe We Heart It.

Love the fandom

fuckyeahleaseydoux:

~Léa Seydoux for Elle Korea, April 2013
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fuckyeahleaseydoux:

~Léa Seydoux for Elle Korea, April 2013

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